Home Lifestyle Who does what? 6 types of chefs you need to know

Who does what? 6 types of chefs you need to know

The executive chef is the boss of the kitchen. Picture: Pexels/Anna Tarazevich

Executive chef

The executive chef is the boss of the kitchen. There is usually just one per restaurant (or chain).

As executive chef, you rarely worry about the main points of food preparation, instead acting as the overseer, keeping the kitchen running smoothly and planning the menu with new dishes that you just devise.

It can take years of formal culinary training and at least a year of kitchen experience to land this job.

Sous chef

The sous chef is the second-in-command and right-hand of the executive chef. Unlike a head chef, there can be more than one sous chef in a kitchen who will step in when the head is not available.

This profession is responsible for micromanaging operations. A keen eye and good communication skills are important for this position.

A pastry chef majors in pastries, desserts, and bread. Picture: Pexels/Dorukhan Pekcan

Pastry chef

Also known as the patissier, a pastry chef is required to go through a different type of training, which you get at a baking school instead of a general culinary school. This type of chef majors in pastries, desserts, and bread.

A pastry chef can be as senior as an executive chef, although this depends on the restaurant you work in. A patissier uses kitchen equipment such as a cake leveller, offset spatula, tabletop mixer, pastry cutter, etc.

Garde manger

A garde manger is a chef who works with refrigeration and food storage. They are responsible for ensuring that all food is stored properly and that the kitchen is kept clean.

They must be familiar with both cold and hot kitchen equipment and what type of kitchen equipment is used for which type of food.

The butcher prepares the meat before it goes to different workstations. Picture: Pexels/Andrés Góngora

Butcher chef

These chefs prepare the meat before it goes to different workstations.

They determine the needs of other chefs and prepare the right type of meat types and cuts needed for the shift.

Additional duties could include examining the quality of meat upon delivery, monitoring inventory, and curing or storing meat as needed. Not all kitchens have a butcher chef.

Saucier

This type of chef creates sauces for every item on the menu. Since the sauce is typically the last element put on a dish, the saucier also assesses the final presentation before serving.

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