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Ramaphosa remains adamant that he will not step aside in spite of growing calls at ANC NEC meeting

Ramaphosa remains adamant that he will not step aside in spite of growing calls at ANC NEC meeting

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma has called for President Cyril Ramaphosa to step down over the Phala Phala farm scandal.

Dlamini-Zuma who attended the ANC's NEC meeting at the weekend where ANC members met on a range of issues, said Ramaphosa needed to show that he respects the ANC step aside resolution. Dlamini-Zuma is not the only ANC NEC member who has in recent times called for Ramaphosa to recuse himself as the leader of the ruling party, and that of the country, following the Phala Phala matter.

Some of the leaders include former heads of state, Jacob Zuma, Thabo Mbeki and Kgalema Motlanthe.

"If Phala Phala money was legitimate business money, why was it in a sofa and not in a bank?" Dlamini-Zuma asked.

The matter on Phala Phala was scheduled for more robust debate on Saturday with many in Ramaphosa's camp calling for him to stay put as ANC president.

While speaking to The Star this past week, Dlamini-Zuma had refrained from commenting on the Phala Phala issue, except to say that she was shocked upon learning that the president had kept millions in foreign currency at his farm without declaring it to the relevant authorities.

During his political view report, Ramaphosa told party leaders at the ANC NEC meeting that the money was proceeds from the sale of game and were legitimate transactions.

Friday was the first time Ramaphosa had addressed the party on the Phala Phala issue with members of the ruling party. The meeting comes just when the section 89 inquiry is set to conclude its report on the matter in a bid to determine if there is prima facie evidence that could lead to Ramaphosa's impeachment process following a motion that was raised by leader of African Transformation Movement (ATM) Vuyo Zungula.

Ramaphosa has come under fire from both opposition leaders in Parliament and more recently from former leaders of the ANC and other party leaders, including Nomvula Mokonyane who said the party was in its worst crisis since its establishment in 1912.

Original Article