City of Cape Town’s Durbanville housing allocations continue despite protest
South Africa

City of Cape Town’s Durbanville housing allocations continue despite protest

City of Cape Town’s Durbanville housing allocations continue despite protest

By Mwangi Githahu Time of article published 24m ago

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Cape Town – A protest at the City’s R34.2 million Morningstar housing project in Durbanville failed in their attempt to prevent Mayco member for human settlements Malusi Booi from handing over the keys to 12 of the 166 home owners.

Supporters of the Morningstar Development and Upliftment Initiative (MDUI) claimed they had come across the names of fake beneficiaries of the low cost housing development project where houses have been standing vacant for almost two years following a court action by the MDUI.

MDUI chairperson Zane Williams said: “We received a list of about 12 people who were meant to move in. Four of the people on the list are not from the Morningstar community but they gave their addresses as being people from this community.

“Tensions are high in the community with regards to this development. We have nothing against people moving in here. We are not even against people from other areas coming into this development. Our problem is with the prioritisation of other people over the heads of people who have been waiting more than 20 years for a house.”

City of Cape Town’s Durbanville housing allocations continue despite protest
Residents from Morningside in Durbanville are unhappy at the way the City of Cape Town is allocating homes to 166 beneficiaries. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)

The handover eventually took place and Booi said: “This matter followed due court processes and negotiations were successful as both parties came to an amicable settlement in October 2020. The settlement was made an order of the court on November 13, 2020.

“The selection of beneficiaries for housing projects is done in accordance with the City’s allocation policy and the City’s housing needs register to ensure that housing opportunities are allocated to qualifying beneficiaries in a fair and equitable manner that prevents queue-jumping.”

Meanwhile, DA provincial spokesperson on Human Settlements Matlhodi Maseko has blamed budget cuts during the 2020/21 financial year and a directive issued by Human Settlements Minister Lindiwe Sisulu for the province’s delay in providing housing.

Maseko said: “In response to my parliamentary questions to the Human Settlements MEC Tertuis Simmers, it has been revealed the instructions by the national government will have a severe impact on all projects in the pre-planning, planning and packaging stages. Fortunately, sites where contractual commitments are in place will continue to completion.”

City of Cape Town’s Durbanville housing allocations continue despite protest
Mayco member for human settlements Malusi Booi at Morningstar in Durbanville on Wednesday with angry residents in the background. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)

Elsewhere, Simmers warned housing beneficiaries against selling their homes.

Simmers said: “I call on our beneficiaries to value the asset which they receive and take care of it. We encourage citizens to draft a will, so that they leave a legacy for their children. They should also not consider renting or selling the property, as doing so would suggest they never had a housing need to start with.

“This shows the province is fully committed to improving the lives of the most vulnerable in society.”

Cape Argus

Original Article

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